State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) explains how reforming Illinois' education funding model to an evidence based structure will lead to better outcomes for all students and taxpayers across the state.
State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) is pushing education funding legislation that will pick up where Senate Bill 1 failed by ensuring new funding for all Illinois school districts, instead of skewing school funding to first drive new money to one school district - Chicago.

Jesiel is Chief Co-Sponsor of House Bill 4069, which is the same as SB 1124 in the Senate. The legislation restores truly equitable funding through an evidence based school funding formula that drives more funding to low income students and to school districts that need it most, along with a hold-harmless provision that prevents any school district from losing funding. The bills include both a base funding and tier funding model that ensures every school district would receive more funding than under SB 1 and was drafted from agreed language in SB 1 before an amendment was added to bail out the Chicago Public School System.

“This legislation creates the clean education funding reform model that students in my district desperately need and represents an opportunity to ensure every child in the state is treated the same, instead of perpetuating an outdated model that picks winners and losers,” said Jesiel.
State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) is pushing education funding legislation that will pick up where Senate Bill 1 failed by ensuring new funding for all Illinois school districts, instead of skewing school funding to first drive new money to one school district - Chicago.

Jesiel is Chief Co-Sponsor of House Bill 4069, which is the same as SB 1124 in the Senate. The legislation restores truly equitable funding through an evidence based school funding formula that drives more funding to low income students and to school districts that need it most, along with a hold-harmless provision that prevents any school district from losing funding. The bills include both a base funding and tier funding model that ensures every school district would receive more funding than under SB 1 and was drafted from agreed language in SB 1 before an amendment was added to bail out the Chicago Public School System.

“This legislation creates the clean education funding reform model that students in my district desperately need and represents an opportunity to ensure every child in the state is treated the same, instead of perpetuating an outdated model that picks winners and losers,” said Jesiel.

She continued, “By using a per-pupil approach to funding, instead of per district approach, and running all funding through the evidence based formula, every district sees more new funding. The State Board of Education has reviewed both plans and their data clearly shows the model in House Bill 4069/Senate Bill 1124 is the most fair and equitable path forward.”

Jesiel noted that the formula in SB 1 builds in perks that only Chicago receives, meaning that Chicago Public Schools would receive a disproportionate share of any new funding that would be run through the model. Under House Bill 4069/Senate Bill 1124, these perks are removed, so that all school districts in the state would receive considerably more of any new funding – in many cases, almost double what would have been received in SB 1. Watch video on the House floor as Jesiel questions school officials on this difference, Click Here and Click Here.
During testimony on the floor of the Illinois House of Representatives, State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) presses school officials to explain why they will not support education funding reform legislation that ensures more fair and equitable funding for all Illinois students.
Asking tough questions during testimony on education funding reform, State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) points out how the alternative proposals to Senate Bill 1, Senate Bill 1124 and House Bill 4069, actually ensure more funding goes to every school district in the state.
Please come to this year’s free senior fair to receive helpful guides, literature and other resources from a variety of state, county and local government agencies. General Assembly staff members will be available to assist constituents with their state government concerns. Attendees are encouraged to sign in for a chance to win a door prize. Refreshments will be served.
The Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) announced Thursday that the unemployment rate declined -0.1 percentage points to 4.6 percent in May and nonfarm payrolls increased by +2,400 jobs over-the-month, based on preliminary data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and released by IDES. April job growth was revised little to show a decrease of -7,300 jobs rather than the preliminary estimate of -7,200 jobs.

May’s modest monthly payroll gain kept over-the-year job growth well below the national average. Payroll growth has been sluggish thus far this year.
State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) has said Governor Rauner’s call for a special session to resolve the budget impasse provides an opportunity to reopen the education funding reform debate and fix the problems with Senate Bill 1.

Prior to the Governor calling for a special session to convene on June 21, several pieces of legislation were released to address the budget impasse. One of those pieces of legislation is House Bill 4069, which utilizes the evidence based funding model that was being negotiated in SB 1 before it was hijacked by special interests and filled with special benefits for Chicago.

“Although I wish the Governor didn’t need to call a special session, this represents a good opportunity to move forward,” said Jesiel. “The lack of a budget vote at the end of May risked causing irreparable damage to the state, but now we have a chance to reopen discussions and finally do the right thing. It also gives us the opportunity to reestablish school funding reform discussions and ensure that we pass reform that provides fair and equitable funding for all children in Illinois regardless of zip code.”
Chicago Beyond is looking to support organization’s with ideas/approaches that help youth succeed. They are now accepting applications nationwide for the second annual Go Innovate Challenge. The Go Innovate Challenge is a competition designed to identify and support transformative, innovative programs, ideas and approaches that have the potential to dramatically impact life outcomes for young people. To participate, interested organizations simply need to submit a 90-second video that describes the program, idea, or approach.

Formed in 2016, Chicago Beyond is a venture philanthropy fund that was created to transform the lives of marginalized young people through two critical issues – safety and educational attainment. The Go Innovate Challenge is part of Chicago Beyond’s effort to build a diverse portfolio of great ideas and partners – from established organizations with proven results to the newest and most innovative early-stage programs and organizations.
One day after House and Senate Leaders unveiled a compromise balanced budget plan to end the budget impasse, Governor Bruce Rauner called lawmakers back to Springfield for a 10-day special session from Wednesday, June 21st through the June 30th fiscal year deadline.

"Republicans in the General Assembly have laid out a compromise budget plan that I can sign," Governor Rauner said in a video announcing special session. "It provides a true path to property tax reduction and it reforms the way our state operates to reduce wasteful spending. It will fund our schools and human services, while spurring economic growth and job creation. It is a true compromise - and one I hope the majority in the General Assembly will accept."
House Minority Leader Jim Durkin (R-Western Springs), Senate Republican Caucus Whip Karen McConnaughay (R-St. Charles), Assistant Senate Republican Leader Jason Barickman (R-Bloomington), Sen. Dale Righter (R-Mattoon), Deputy House Republican Leader Patti Bellock (R-Hinsdale) and House Republican Conference Chairperson Tom Demmer (R-Dixon) have introduced a package of bills to end the budget impasse. The bills represent a compromise balanced budget and reforms that address the priorities of both parties, and urged the General Assembly to return to Springfield to vote on this proposal. State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) said she is evaluating the proposal.
Small Business Administration - Prime 2017
The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has issued Program Announcement No. PRIME-2017-01 to provide training and capacity building grant programs to microenterprise development organizations (MDOs). The PRIME Act authorizes the SBA to provide funding to qualified organizations for the purposes of: (i) providing training and technical assistance to disadvantaged entrepreneurs; (ii) providing training and capacity building assistance to microenterprise development organizations (MDOs) and programs; (iii) aiding in Research and development of best practices for microenterprise and technical assistance programs for disadvantaged entrepreneurs; and (iv) for other activities as the SBA Administrator determines. Click Here.
On June 10, 2017, North Point Marina held a Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony following an agreement signed earlier this year to put the marina under the private management of Westrec Marinas. The move it expected to provide an economic boost to the surrounding communities. State Representative Sheri Jesiel (R-Winthrop Harbor) played an integral role in launching the request for proposal by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources that led to the private management and was on hand to cut the ribbon for the grand opening.

"It was a great day for a Grand Opening," said Jesiel. "The results of the investment from Westrec are already starting to show."
The downgrades imposed by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s, move Illinois to the brink of “junk bond” status. The rating status, which in Moody’s terminology is “Baa3” and in S&P’s wording is “BBB-“, comes with a “negative outlook,” a formal warning by both debt-rating firms that a further demotion of Illinois’ status to non-investment-grade is both possible and relatively imminent. The moves, announced on Thursday, June 1, followed the Democrat-controlled General Assembly’s failure to enact a FY18 budget by the May 31st deadline.
SB 886 contains provisions to allow the State to sell one of its principal pieces of property, the city block in downtown Chicago that currently contains the James R. Thompson Center. The 1.2 million-square-foot office building is currently home to 2,200 State of Illinois workers. However, the 1985 building has not been maintained and requires hundreds of millions of dollars in overdue upkeep and maintenance.

The building’s footprint, which is bounded by LaSalle, Lake, Clark, and Randolph Streets, could be re-used for development. A new building on the site could house private-sector workers, and its owner or operator would pay property taxes to Chicago Public Schools and other public-sector entities that face financial challenges in 2017. As a State building, the Thompson Center currently does not pay property taxes.
On the final day of the scheduled spring session, House Democrats rushed a vote on a new school funding formula, Senate Bill 1, which would provide Chicago Public Schools (CPS) with a $500 million bailout while offering empty promises to the rest of the state’s public schools.

The Democrats’ bailout bill would provide CPS with a more than $500 million windfall that will only continue to grow in future years. With the State already owing Illinois schools more than $1 billion this year and no way identified to pay for the new formula, Republicans stood in opposition to SB 1.